Design

Concrete, Part 4

I’ve said that different materials lend themselves to different forms, and that there is such a thing as a concrete-inflected structural type. That idea leads, unfortunately, to a discussion of the collapse of the Morandi Bridge in Genoa last August. The bridge had a number fo different components (click on the picture above to expand it) …

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Concrete, Part 3

Concrete has become something of a scapegoat for carbon emissions in building, but it’s amazingly difficult to pin down how bad it is, as a material, compared with other options. The problem, simply, is that it is difficult to make apples-to-apples comparisons of efficiency and carbon use across different structural systems. Let’s start with weight. …

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Unclear Boundaries

That beautiful concrete is the undercroft, for want of a better term, at the London Bridge rail station. The station has a top-heavy configuration, with the entrances at street level and the tracks above. This makes sense for a constrained-site urban station, and London Bridge’s operational set-up reminded me of Jamaica Station. The concrete groin …

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An Old Problem Resurfaces

Innovations sometimes don’t work well. The Millennium Bridge in London, which was a new twist on suspension bridge design, moved noticeably when it was built and needed a retrofit to reduce the sway. An article on the intersection of structural dynamics, statistics, and the biomechanics of the human gait – Walking Crowds on a Shaky …

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